Wright Career College Announces Closure

Marla Neher worked as a librarian for Wright Career College for three years. She said she was always worried that the students who spent thousands of dollars to attend the private for-profit college were not getting a good education. “I know students who went up to six weeks without a book,” said Neher, who left Wright Career College three years ago.

She said students paid for the books in advance but Wright rarely kept enough in stock. “I personally felt they were taking advantage of students form a lower economic status or mental status and preying on a great hope of getting a college degree,” Neher said.

On Friday, Wright Career College closed its doors and filed bankruptcy, leaving students stranded the day they were supposed to start taking final exams. One former Wright graduate, who agreed to talk to FOX 4 if we didn’t reveal his name, said his degree actually hindered his job search in the medical field. He blamed Wright’s poor reputation for churning out students without adequate training or education. He said some of his classmates were given degrees even though they failed the final exam. None of these allegations surprised Independence attorney Ken MClain who is suing the college on behalf of 164 students. “Sometimes they are given tests without the text book,” McClain said. “Sometimes they are dropped into the middle of a semester and required to begin where other people have been studying for three months.”

McClain said Wright administrators had to have known how poorly prepared their students were. McClain said Wright made the mistake of hiring its own class valedictorian in the IT program. After graducating, “he was hired by Wright Career College and they fired him because he wasn’t qualified,” said McClain. McClain called the college: “the most abusive system that has been set up to try and make money off of education that I have ever run across.”

The Wright system, which has campuses in four states, is headquartered in Overland Park in a building on Metcalf Avenue. A student told us that the top floor of the Wright administration building houses the lavish private residence of Wright President John Mucci. FOX 4 Problem Solvers tried to pay a visit to Wright just a few days before the school announced it was closing. We didn’t get further than the front door before Mucci asked us to leave and referred all comments to the school’s attorney. The attorney never returned our phone calls. In the past, lawyers for Wright Career College have denied all allegations raised against the college, saying it has provided a quality education for students.

Many Wright students FOX 4 Problem Solvers talked to tell us they owe between $20,000 to $40,000 in federal loans. Former students said they were unable to ever transfer their credits from Wright to a public college or university. However, former students form Wright Career College may now qualify for student loan forgiveness due to the closure of the school. To see if you qualify, call (866) 823-5649.

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